Less is the new luxe

Kiran Singh

Minimalism shows its softer side

In these days of social distancing and homeworking, good interior design is more important for our wellbeing than ever before. The new minimalism takes us back to the bare essentials, but it’s anything but sterile. Every time we step outside, we’re doing our best to minimise contact with each other, so that makes us crave the softness and warmth of natural materials like wood in our homes. It’s no coincidence that parquet flooring is in the spotlight right now. Pale-toned woods fit perfectly with zen-like minimalist interiors that focus on maximising light and space.

Inspired by Marie Kondo

For a while now, tidying experts have been telling us that throwing unnecessary ballast overboard is a great way to achieve an ordered mind and a sense of peace. The new minimalism isn’t an intellectual statement that idolises emptiness, it’s a philosophy for life. We are all going back to basics. The art of letting go is no longer a cliché but a daily reality. And this explains the worldwide success of the Japanese KonMari method, which turns to throw things away into an art form. The ultimate goal is to create spaces that give us a zen feeling… Now we only consume and invest in things that are sustainable and make a real difference.

Less is the new luxe

The New Minimalism

Less is more. The concept is familiar, but now minimalism is showing us its softer side. The sterile black and white designs of 1990s interiors have made way for warmer tones of beige, sandy colours and powder shades, all combined with tactile elements like soft carpets and handmade knitwear. It’s no coincidence that Japandi, a combination of Japanese and Scandinavian design, is so big right now. The minimalist lines, organic forms and light colour palette fit perfectly with a new design philosophy that aims to create peace and harmony. The focus on natural materials also explains the intensive use of wood throughout schemes, not just for furniture but also for floors and even walls and ceilings. In a time when human contact is being kept to a minimum, we are cherishing the warmth of wood more than ever.

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The warmth of wood

It’s no wonder that the demand for wooden parquet flooring is increasing. Lightwoods, in particular, are hugely popular at the moment, because they help to increase the sense of light and space. Nature’s beauty is in its variety and detail, and that’s exactly what the parquet range from Quick-Step offers. The pale-toned woods in particular, with hardly any knots or cracks, work perfectly in a zen interior that creates purity and visual serenity.

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